Journalist Denise Brodey Has Been Working to Destigmatize Disability and Mental Health for Years. Now She’s Educating Others On Neurodiversity.

Spotify, Google, and Starbucks have all amped up their wellness and mental health support in recent years, with Chief Mental Health Officer-Advisor roles becoming an active member in C-suite offices from 2018. What is one piece of feedback you’d give companies on how they can better shape their wellness-mental health programs?

“Talk less, do more—and share the wins, no matter how small. Much of what you say can be forgotten but what you do and how your employees feel about it can really make a difference. It will allow others to feel comfortable talking about their own challenges or successes.”

Male Beauty Influencer and Content Creator @richardcadrouce Breaks Down Anxiety Episodes in Home and Work, Growing Up with a Difficult Childhood, and Content Creating with Body Dysmorphia

“Also, constant worry about random scenarios that I’m convinced are ‘totally possible’, bring me anxiety. For example: ‘the L train is going to randomly impact another train and we all gonna d*e’ so I’m sitting there trying to listen to the music on my Airpods and ignore my thoughts but sometimes even after 10 inhalations/exhalations it is impossible not to feel scared.”

Theresa Hayes on Foster Care, Therapy, and How She Protects Her Mental Health Using Self-talk

“As a child I went to an elementary school where the students were predominantly white, like I could count all of the people of color with 2 hands. I remember thinking, “why does my school get to have a gymnastics class apart from regular gym class, and a drama class when all of the other schools I attended before with predominantly African American students didn’t have that at all.” I didn’t really understand why things were the way they were just because the people lived in different neighborhoods, but I began to understand as I grew older.”

Victoria Secret Model & Mental Health Advocate Ali Tate Cutler On Developmental Mental Health, Body Image, and Working to Replacing Stigma with Hope

“I struggled with my mental health as a child a lot. It was in regards to my own body. I always felt fat, and believed no one would like me or date me because of it. It was only in my 20s that I let that belief go, and then I discovered anxiety about other issues. But the main struggles in my life were always about my sense of unlovability. I just didn’t feel worthy of connection or love and if I don’t keep on top of that, it comes up in my life today.”

Art and the Pandemic: Why It’s Good For Your Mental Health

Stress is often expressed and reflected through statements such as “I feel tense”, “I’m worried,” or “I’m restless”; It manifests itself physically in the body from acne breakouts and psoriasis (red, itchy, scaly patches) to neck and chest pain. When you feel stressed, this immediately arouses the brain which then triggers hyperactivity in the amygdala, which subsequently triggers a stress response in your entire being.

Sad Girls Club Executive Director Brianne Patrice on Motherhood & Mental Health, Sexual Assault, and Mental Health for Women of Color

“There’s no reason why the conversations around motherhood shouldn’t speak to the totality of who a woman is. We have to stop telling women that when they become mothers they must become martyrs. No one EVER asks a man how he is going to have a family and hold down a job. No one ever tells a man that he must give up the parts of himself that make him human, that give him life. But we always tell women that she can’t both work and raise kids or that she must give up her dreams, whatever they may be. It’s time we stop that.”

Mental Health Consultant and Founder Chou Hallegra on Christianity and Faith, Mental Health, and Racial Justice

How do you think the historical legacy of the Christian church has contributed to the current mental health stigma that exists in the faith community?

“Lack of knowledge perpetuates stigma. In the past, people didn’t know much about mental illness and have done horrible things to others for the sake of “curing” them of their ailments. Today, those who are not open to talking about mental illness still see those who suffer from it as people who have little to no faith. In reality, there is more that comes to play here. People can have faith and still feel depressed.”